Paternity Actions

“Paternity” refers to the legal establishment of who is the biological father of a child. While the identity of a child’s biological mother is usually by nature easy to establish, the father’s identity may in some cases be uncertain. Paternity issues often arise in cases involving child support, but they can also be important in relation to adoption, inheritance, custody and visitation, health care, and other issues.

Paternity Actions in Court

An action to establish paternity is a civil proceeding. Both Missouri and Kansas require that once there is a presumption of paternity that presumption can only be rebutted by clear and convincing evidence. It is important to know that if even if the Father has signed the birth certificate that establishes a presumption of paternity that the Father have a court make the legal determination of paternity.

DNA Testing and Paternity

The advent of DNA profiling was a major breakthrough in paternity testing. In a DNA test, the scientist examines the genetic material that the child inherited from its biological parents. First the child’s genetic characteristics are compared to those of the mother. The characteristics in the child that are not found in the mother are determined to have come from the father. If the man being tested does not have these genetic characteristics in his DNA, he can be scientifically excluded. If the man does have such characteristics, the probability of his paternity is calculated. DNA testing can establish a father’s paternity with over ninety-nine percent accuracy. DNA testing can be done even before the child is born.

Establishing Paternity

DNA testing is routinely done even when neither party is contesting paternity. For instance, the putative (or “alleged”) father in a paternity action that is the basis for child support collection may require proof that he is the child’s father before he consents to payment of support. In other cases, the mother may contest the putative father’s paternity, such as when a man attempts to gain custody of or visitation with a child he believes to be his. In many other cases, there is no argument between the parents, and paternity can be established voluntarily. Paternity may also be established by circumstantial evidence, such as when a man takes the child into his home and holds the child out to the public as his own. A married man is presumed to be the father of a baby born to his wife during or shortly after their marriage.

Once paternity is established, the father may be ordered to pay child support for his child and the Court will establish a custodial arrangement and parenting plan that will provide frequent and meaningful contact for both mother and father. Paternity issues, like most family law issues, can have far-reaching implications, both financially and emotionally. When faced with these issues, it is important to seek the counsel of an objective, experienced lawyer.



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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.